3 June, 2017

3 June, 2017

Thanks to a certain vendor (we’ll let them identify themselves if they wish) willing to take a chance with a startup parachute manufacturer, we have been quite busy here.  Taking a break at the moment after the second bobbin change this morning to express our sincere thanks and appreciation for the opportunity to serve as not only OEM for kits, but also for TARC teams.  We’ve been making LOTS of BLS-12, BLS-15, and BLS-36’s for them, and have been cycling through material left and right so we’ve increased our par levels of material kept in-stock just to keep up (truly, an excellent “problem” for us to have!).

R&D still continues: among other things we’re working on,  even larger ALS chutes are in the works!  We’re quite excited to be able to soon offer large chutes to the L3 flying community!

Okay, this cup of coffee’s done, so, back to production…

 

Later!

–Coop

 

25 May, 2017

25 May, 2017

 

We have some very, very exciting news forthcoming, which we are eager to share, but cannot JUST yet.  I know: it’s a tease, but we’ve learned over the years to not make announcements that aren’t a Sure Thing, with capital letters and everything.  Let’s just say we are super excited about this, and thrilled to have been busy busy busy making a number of canopies –we’ve gone through our entire stock of Rageapple Red and Squid Ink Black, and need to get some more to finish up.

Also, we have added an “any color” option to each canopy on the site for those without preference.  It costs you no extra to select your own colors, but “any color” may get you your canopy faster.  If selected,  we will choose two colors from our stock and fashion something that seems right to us –a light and dark color, usually, with trim matching the thread and shroud lines.

 

Later!

–Coop

23 May, 2017

23 May, 2017.

 

With thanks to Bob Ford and Whutta Design, Paramedichutes.com has an official logo.  One can expect to see this very soon on things like range box stickers and labels on our canopies and tracking streamers.  Bob was wonderful to work with and we’re thrilled with how it came out!  Please consider Whutta Design for all your advertising or graphic design needs and tell ’em Coop sent ya…

Also, recently, York College of PA’s NASA Student Launch team has chosen Paramedichutes for recovery of their entry into this collegiate-level contest.  Paramedichutes is proud to support this student-driven endeavor, and wish these young engineers the greatest success.  They’re the ones that ordered that ALS-84 in Elfdruid Green and Pearly White –their school’s colors– that we posted photos of last week.  Our understanding is it had a successful flight at our home field of MDRA to spitting distance of a mile –at the sod farm!–with main deployment at 600′.  Great job, Spartans!

Later!

–Coop

 

13 May, 2017

13 May, 2017

 

Got some good photos of the newest ALS-84 we made for a particular customer this past week, and the crews on at Medic 7 were kind enough to allow themselves to be coerced

ALS-84 in Elfdruid Green and Pearly White with White Satin threatens to lift CPT Gidget.

recruited into helping out.  Besides, I suspect they just enjoy seeing what kind of madness we’ve come up with THIS time.

The ALS-84 here is for a customer who’ll be packing this 7′ chute into a 4″ airframe.  This should not be a problem–but even if they don’t have an overabundance of internal volume, the ALS series comes stock with an apex loop to which pilots can be attached, visible in many of these photos,

ALS-84 in Elfdruid Green and Pearly White, with White Satin.

so getting this thing out of the rocket and inflated should be no problem at all.

We are proud to be able to deliver this chute ahead of schedule for the customer, and enjoyed working with them in color selection, sizing, and configuration.  While they opted for the standard alternating pattern you can see  here, other options were considered,

CPT Gidget is waiting for a wind gust so the ALS-84 can drag her off.

including doubling the gores so that it was two Pearly Whites, two Elfdruid Greens ( which would make the 16-gore look more similar to one of our BLS 8-gore models),  and a starburst pattern  (sadly, no published photos of this pattern as of this moment; we only have it in prototype projects we’ve been working on).

This chute was made entirely on The Mule, our 1936 Singer model 201-2.  Even with the heavy-duty thread used on the bridle and lines, the old machine performed without so much as a hiccup.

We’re proud of this one and look forward to being able to help you with your recovery needs.  Visit our store and grant us the opportunity to custom craft something for you today.

 

ALS-84 in Elfdruid Green and Pearly White, with White Satin.

 

Later!

–Coop

12 May, 2017

Thanks to the awesome crews of Medic 7, we have some great shots of the last ALS-84 we made on The Mule,  that will be published over the next couple of days.   Can’t wait to deliver this to the customer!

 

Later!

–Coop

7 May, 2017

7 May, 2017.

The past couple of weeks have been madness over here, and we’re loving the chaos: it means things are being done.  Recent acquisition of a dining room table at which we five can sit has necessitated moving the sewing machines to the sunroom.  Colder out there, but the view is better.  I can see a full half of the yard as I work on whatever it is we’re making at the moment.

There’s an ALS-84 coming together nicely on The Mule right now.  MDRA returns to the sod farm a couple weeks from now which means back to testing something we have been working on for a couple of years.  We have this Binder Design Excel we bought last year and have been meaning to build to serve as a test bed, but….. things happened, and we’ve not quite got around to building it yet.

One of the things that’s happened is The Queen is in one of her moods.  She’s out of service right now, as she keeps shredding threads.  Her 104-year-old throat plate is suspected to be worn, as I can’t find burrs anywhere.  I’m going to replace her throat plate and hook, and see how she does from there.   Fortunately, parts for her are not difficult to find.

 

Later!

–Coop

24 April, 2017

The QRS streamer line seems to be getting some attention of late.  We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to make these large streamers for our customers.   We’ve made a few over the past couple of weeks and wanted to share a few photos of the works as they were in progress.

Just finishing the hems here on a QRS-09 for a customer.

 

This Nothing Rhymes With Orange QRS-09 was sent to a customer wanting something to help them visually track their rocket down from apogee.  This is where the QRS line excels, as the length and width of the descending streamer is (usually) much larger than the rocket to which they’re attached.  With a total of 972 square inches of high-visibility orange to look for, this ought to help quite a bit.

Another project we finished was a QRS-12 for a different customer.  This tracking streamer was ordered in Tweensquee pink.  My daughter is now demanding

Front and back side of a QRS-12 showing The Mule’s stitches.

various projects made in this material, including dresses for some kind of goth barbie werewolves.  I know I should have made this one at the EMS station.  Heheh.  The QRS-12 in Tweensquee Pink turned out nicely and that’s in no small part to The Mule, our 1936 Singer model 201-2.  This machine throws a wonderful stitch by any standard… made all the more impressive when it’s over eighty years old.

 

LDRS was fantastic –we always enjoy traveling down to Higgs’ Farm, and this time was even better.  The kids got to run amok oogling over the huge rockets –Mr. Tom’s square Higgs Farm rocket was a big hit, as was Mr. Geoff’s O-Powered Dewalt rocket, as well as Mr. Robert and Miss Gloria’s full-scale Patriot.  MDRA always puts on such a good event, and we’re proud to fly with these fine folks.   Can’t wait for the next launch!

 

Later!

–Coop

Happy LDRS!

LDRS opens today at MDRA!  We’re very excited to be heading down to this event.

BLS-60 in Tweensquee Pink and Squid Ink Black with black satin and apex loop option.

Unfortunately, we’re going to miss today and tomorrow’s flying time because the kids have state testing this week at school.

We will be arriving Friday evening, and will be on the field both Saturday and Sunday.

You may have noticed that we added a few more photos to the site this week, as we promised we would be doing.  We’ll be adding more as time goes on, not to worry.  It’s a little harder than one might suspect, getting a decent shot of a parachute from the ground.

BLS-60 in Tweensquee Pink and Squid Ink Black with black satin and apex loop option.

Our method is to get one of the younger co-workers out there and have them  hold it into the wind,

snap a bunch, and see what works best.  This works because if the human has to be in the shot,  too, may as well be a good-looking young person rather than some middle-aged, balding nerd.

BLS-48 in Rageapple Red and Squid Ink Black with black satin trim and apex loop option.

We’ll be flying our King Kraken, Bucky Jones, and other models with our BLS chutes down at LDRS when we get there.  We might even bring back a H-powered G-force on a QRS-36, just for giggles.

 

Later!

–Coop

 

 

23 March, 2017

Over the last few days, new product pages have been added for the ALS-72, ALS-84, and ALS-96 Advanced High-Power Main Canopies.  These large chutes are for weight ranges typically lofted by K, L, or M motors.  We have plans for even larger main canopies in this line (10′ and more!) and will be adding these to the site, soon (There’s only so much of this I can do before my eyes go wonky).

Also, we have gone through and added pilot recommendations for these large chutes.  Pilots should be 5% of the main canopy diameter or less, so one might consider the smaller(BLS-12-18) BLS chutes for pilot duties.  We’ve also gone through the typical weight range for each chute and made QRS tracking streamer recommendations for dual-deploy scenarios.

Lastly, we’ve cleaned up and clarified the categories, allowing the web customer to quickly browse by Model, Mid-Power, or High-Power recovery, and by certification levels (again, this is based on typical recovery weight… nothing saying a BLS-60 can’t recover a lightweight rocket flying on an M… we just think it’ll see more use on I, J and K  95% of the time based upon its recovery weight capacity).

A lot of the product photos are stand-ins (a few good shots of the same couple chutes and streamers used over and over).  We will be changing these as we get more.  We know a couple of people really handy with a camera and will be coercing recruiting them for photo shoots real soon.  The weather here has been garbage, but Spring is allegedly here, so we should see some nice days coming up, according to the Super Doppler Window.

Later!

–Coop